Current Uses & Research

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Microdosing

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Laws & Regulations

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Legal Status

Microdosing

The term microdosing refers to the act of taking an unnoticeable amount of a psychedelic substance everyday for a certain amount of days, weeks, or months. It caught the attention of the world in 2011 when Dr. James Fadiman wrote about in his book, The Psychedelic Explorer’s Guide: Safe, Therapeutic, and Sacred Journeys.

Since then, it’s become a subculture of psychedelic use and is practiced by thousands of people for a variety of reasons, with psilocybin being one of the most common substances to microdose. Some of the main reasons people experiment with microdosing is to reduce their stress and anxiety, increase their focus, reach higher levels of creativity, or to give themselves more energy.

Studies have shown that microdosing psilocybin is a safe and non-threatening introduction to the psychedelic substance. However, as with all substances, there are minor risks and side effects, such as emotional turbulence and anxiety. It’s always best to consult a professional before starting a regimen.

Laws / Regulations / Activism Today

Since the Controlled Substances Act was passed in 1971, all psychedelic substances have been made illegal and deemed Schedule I drugs. However, with strong activism that’s taken place over generations, the medical industry and drug and law regulators have been pushed to see all of the positive health benefits many of these substances possess. 

For decades, organizations like the Multidisciplinary Association For Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) and Erowid have been committed to educating the public on research and providing trustworthy information. It’s because of the work they do, as well as many other organizations and nonprofits, that cities are starting to not only decriminalize psychedelic substances, mostly psilocybin, but are also finding ways to make it more accessible. For example, in Oakland, California, instead of creating a for-profit market, they implemented a Grow, Gather, Gift framework that encourages people to grow their own plants, gather their own plants, and gift their own plants.

Although psilocybin is still considered a Schedule I drug, some cities and states are starting to loosen up on regulations. In Denver, Colorado it’s legal to grow magic mushrooms for personal use but illegal to sell or distribute; New Mexico decriminalized growing magic mushrooms in 2005; and in 2020 Oregon became the first state to legalize them.

There’s still a lot of work to do, but we can expect to see a large amount of progress in the coming years.